Barbara’s conservation work rewarded

POSITIVE: Murringo farmer Barbara Holloway’s bush regeneration work has earned her recognition and a grant from the Private Land Conservation grants program.

POSITIVE: Murringo farmer Barbara Holloway’s bush regeneration work has earned her recognition and a grant from the Private Land Conservation grants program.

Murringo’s Barbara Holloway is one of two recipients of a 2014 Private Land Conservation Grant for outstanding conservation efforts.

She is set to receive $870 that will go towards bush regeneration works including weed control, assisted natural recovery of bushland and plantings.

“This grant will allow me to remove some of the Callitris, which has become a woody weed on [my property “Blue Bucket”],” Barbara said.

She will then use the cut Callitris to prevent erosion on slopes until an understorey of new natives is built.

“Which will create a better ecological balance, assist in repairing soil and allow the return of wildlife to the area,” she said.

Barbara has been doing conservation work on the property for the last 12 years and said she’s realistic when it comes to the job.

“The more healthy natural environment there is, the healthier farmlands are,” she said.

“I can’t guarantee anything that happens in the future of course, but at least this generation of wrens or lizards or beetles is having a fine old time. 

“And the grant helps on working on restoring vegetation that ought to be here. It’s a very slow process,” she said.

A Reids Flat couple were the other recipients of a grant to plant 60 trees.

The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife - funded and supported by an alliance of not-for-profits and government agencies - has been offering grants to owners of properties protected under conservation agreements since 2008.

This year they awarded over $315,000 in grants across NSW.

CEO of the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife Susanna Bradshaw said it was important to support individuals undertaking conservation works on their own properties.

“Because 83.5 per cent of Australia is outside of the formal network of protected areas,” she said.

“Individuals who manage all or parts of their properties for conservation deserve our recognition. They are effectively voluntary park rangers, and they provide an incredible contribution to the welfare of Australia’s environment.”

The next funding round of the Private Land Conservation Grants program will open in early 2015.

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