Thousands going to Qld Black Lives rally

Thousands of people are expected to march in Brisbane as part of a Black Lives Matter protest.
Thousands of people are expected to march in Brisbane as part of a Black Lives Matter protest.

Thousands of people are expected to join Black Lives Matter protests by marching through Brisbane as coronavirus restrictions limiting public gatherings in Queensland are eased.

The rally against First Nations deaths in custody, violence and systemic racism towards black people is due to begin at King George Square at noon on Saturday and wind through the city to Musgrave Park.

Organiser Bogaine Spearim says community anger over black deaths in custody has not gone away.

"We will continue to hit the streets and disrupt until there is justice," he told AAP.

Saturday's rallies in Brisbane, Darwin, Perth, Adelaide, Cairns and Kempsey are a continuation of the global protests sparked by the death of African American man George Floyd during an arrest in May.

"Deaths are continuing to happen in Australia - Dave Dungay Jnr said 'I can't breathe' before dying in custody," Mr Spearim said.

Mr Dungay died in 2015 after he was restrained by five prison officers in Sydney's Long Bay jail after he refused to stop eating biscuits.

The protest organisers are demanding changes to the policies that have led to 432 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths custody in Australia since 1991.

They also want anti-racism training in schools and the reopening of all inquests and investigations into Aboriginal deaths in custody.

The Brisbane protest comes as coronavirus health restrictions are eased across Queensland.

Private gatherings of up to 100 people are now allowed in homes. Weddings and funerals can host up to 100, and contact sport is also back. Casinos and food courts will also reopen.

More fans can watch professional sporting events, with up to 25,000 spectators or 50 per cent of a venue's capacity permitted.

Commercial events of up to 500 people can also go ahead without permission from the authorities, as long as they abide by the rules.

Australian Associated Press