St John's Anglican Church Op Shop helps Young community

Kaye Pritchard, Jean Basham Op Shop Coordinator, Joy Flett, Neil Percival, Dorothy Shepherd, Kerry Palmer and Cheryl Matthews. Photo: contributed
Kaye Pritchard, Jean Basham Op Shop Coordinator, Joy Flett, Neil Percival, Dorothy Shepherd, Kerry Palmer and Cheryl Matthews. Photo: contributed

St John's Anglican Church Op Shop has supported the local community for several decades.

A loyal group of volunteers regularly sort through the clothes and other items that are deposited in the two collection bins in front of the church hall.

These people enjoy their time together of a Monday morning while another group of volunteers operate the Op Shop from Tuesday to Thursday.

Each year, the proceeds of the Op Shop are reinvested in the local community in the form of donations to community groups.

"This year disbursements were reduced due to COVID-19 restrictions and the committee had a difficult task deciding on which groups to support," said the Rector, the Venerable Dr Neil Percival OAM.

The generous donations from the church were presented to representatives from various community groups on Wednesday, February 15.

Kerry Palmer represented Young Crisis Accommodation Centre, who, in accepting her donation said "it was a pleasure to watch the Op Shop volunteers working in processing items for sale".

She said their help in getting appropriate housing, which was not easy at the moment, was much appreciated.

Their number one concern was to get people back on their feet.

Cheryl Matthews responded on behalf of Riding for the Disabled.

"Last year we were completely closed but still had to maintain our fourteen horses, requiring constant feed and exercise and care.

"Another major expense was replacing riding helmets which must be done every five years," said Cheryl.

Dorothy Shepherd represented the Hospital Auxiliary and congratulated all the Op Shop workers for their service to the community during restrictions and the pandemic.

Their money will go towards buying new equipment for the hospital, costs varied from very small items to some costing $45,000, they rely on the hospital to select what items should be purchased.

Joy Flett represented her daughters, Tarni and Katrina, who are the chief fund raisers for Motor Neurone Disease.

Joy said her husband had died from MND five years ago which inspired the family to raise money to support research into this terrible disease.

Their slogan was "never Give Up".

Apologies were received from the Young Community Hub and Young Special Religious Education, who were unable to send representatives.

Kaye Pritchard, from Anglicare NSW and ACT, came over from Canberra to say how much the dedication, professionalism, and hard work of the volunteers was appreciated.