No change to SA virus rules for Omicron

Premier Steven Marshall said SA would take whatever action was necessary for the Omicron variant.
Premier Steven Marshall said SA would take whatever action was necessary for the Omicron variant.

South Australia has left current border arrangements and local COVID-19 restrictions in place despite concerns over the new Omicron variant of the virus.

The state's transition committee met on Tuesday and decided against any changes, which leaves SA open to vaccinated travellers from all states, with some requirements for testing and quarantine.

International arrivals are being required to quarantine for 14 days, regardless of where they come from.

Local restrictions, such as mandatory mask-wearing on public transport and in most venues, will also remain.

"It's too early to actually make any determination about the impact of this particular strain of the virus," Police Commissioner Grant Stevens told reporters.

"I'm hopeful we can hold our position, so people can continue to travel.

"But as we've said right through the course of the pandemic, be flexible with your travel plans so you don't get caught on the hop."

Premier Steven Marshall said SA would take whatever action was necessary to protect people from the Omicron variant.

"We're learning more about the new variant every hour," Mr Marshall said on Monday.

"We'll have to take whatever action is necessary based upon medical advice, but it's still very early days.

"Obviously we've got to be nimble. We've got to make sure we respond to the threat as that threat morphs and changes."

Australia has shut its borders to nine southern African countries in response to the Omicron variant while NSW, Victoria, SA and the ACT have brought in new rules for all international arrivals.

Genomic testing has confirmed the variant in cases who recently arrived in Sydney and Darwin.

SA reported no new coronavirus cases on Tuesday and has seven active infections being managed in hotel quarantine.

There have now been 10 cases since the state's border rules relaxed on November 23.

SA's vaccination rate has reached 80.1 per cent for those aged 12 and over.

Mr Stevens said he would have expected SA to have detected more virus cases with the influx of arrivals from NSW, Victoria and the ACT.

He said so far more than 100,000 people had accessed the online application process to come into the state.

"That shows a very controlled introduction of COVID-19 into South Australia," the commissioner said.

Australian Associated Press