Adelaide to host space manufacturing hub

The South Australian government will partner with four companies to set up the Australian Space Park
The South Australian government will partner with four companies to set up the Australian Space Park

Australia's first dedicated space manufacturing hub will be established in Adelaide to help produce everything from small satellites to flying vehicles.

The South Australian government will partner with four companies to set up the Australian Space Park with the government investing $20 million in the new facility.

It will boost the state's space manufacturing capability at a purpose-built site, with companies focusing on the production of small satellites, rockets, electrical vertical takeoff and landing vehicles and supporting componentry and technical systems.

Premier Steven Marshall said the government was transforming SA into the undisputed space state as a key part of future-proofing jobs for decades to come.

"The creation of the Australian Space Park signals our commitment to the South Australian and Australian space sector by bridging the gap between research and development and prototyping to production at scale," he said.

"The hub aligns with Australia's space strategy that aims to triple the space sector's contribution to GDP to over $12 billion per annum and create up to an additional 20,000 jobs by 2030.

"The Australian Space Park is the next step in positioning Australia's space community to deliver the entire space value chain, enabling the design, manufacture, launch and mission control of new space capabilities."

Fleet Space Technologies chief executive Flavia Tata Nardini said the space park would enhance Australia's growing reputation for industry capability within the global space and advanced aerospace sectors.

"We are delighted to be part of a facility that is the first of its kind in the southern hemisphere," Ms Tata Nardini said.

"The opportunity to collaborate with leading minds in our field in a dedicated facility like this will accelerate progress for our entire industry."

Another company involved in the space park, Q-CTRL, said the facility was necessary to transform Australia's lead in the quantum tech industry into a strategic global advantage in the space sector.

"One of the most exciting things we're planning in terms of our growth is the development of new forms of satellites that leverage quantum technology to give us a new way of seeing the earth," chief executive Mike Biercuk said.

"What excites us the most about the space sector right now is the way that companies like mine that have never had access to space all of a sudden have the ability to take our core technology to orbit to the moon and Mars."

Australian Associated Press