State budget: Young High school library upgrade

Young has almost been forgotten in the 2017 state budget, despite a record surplus from asset sales and widespread spending on education facilities in other rural towns.

Funding announcement: Member for Cootamundra Katrina Hodgkinson said planning would begin in the coming months on an upgrade to the Young High School library.

Funding announcement: Member for Cootamundra Katrina Hodgkinson said planning would begin in the coming months on an upgrade to the Young High School library.

The Young High School Library will receive funding for an upgrade which should deliver improved educational outcomes for the community.

Member for Cootamundra Katrina Hodgkinson said planning would begin in the coming months on an upgrade to the library.

“This project is part of the NSW Government's record commitment to education across the state,” she said.

“I welcome the funding for the library upgrade at the school. This project will provide the education facilities our community needs and deserves.

"I'm pleased the NSW Government is delivering this much-needed local infrastructure to support our community."

Education Minister Rob Stokes said NSW public schools were expected to enrol an additional 164,000 students by 2031, and this project would provide improved and expanded learning environments for the growing student population.

"This project will ensure local students and staff have the resources they need to succeed in the 21st century," he said.

The NSW government announced $2.2 billion in new funding which will result in 123 schools being built or upgraded across NSW to address overcrowding fuelled by an increase in student enrolments.

But the State Government has been accused of only looking after LNP held seats with education infrastructure spending.

An analysis shows there are 56 schools slated for funding from Liberal-held seats and 21 in Nationals-held seats, for a total of 77 projects in Coalition-held electorates.

This compares with four projects in Greens-held seats, three in seats held by Independents and 39 in Labor-held seats.

Labor's education spokesman Jihad Dib accused the government of "playing politics" with children's education.

"Funding should be allocated on a needs basis – such as those areas that are undergoing the greatest growth – not in the electorates where the Liberals and their junior partner are under the greatest threat," he said

But Education Minister Rob Stokes said the accusation was "ridiculous."

"Clearly the opposition doesn't understand that the parties in government represent more electorates with more schools, more people and more growth – hence more school projects," he said.